Former Pupils

 

Serbian Herioters

(1) Djordje Aleksić

At the outset of the war Djordje was living with his father, a rope-maker, and his two small sisters in Vranje in mountainous southern Serbia. His mother had died during the Balkan Wars of 1912 and 1913. He joined the School in September, 1914, aged fourteen.

(2) Petar Deretić

Petar was from Montenegro, the son of a deceased Serbian Orthodox priest. He had just turned fifteen when he joined Heriot's in November, 1916.

(3) Danilo Djokić

Danilo was from Kragujevac, sixty miles south of Belgrade. Like Petar, he was the son of a deceased priest. He was sixteen years old when he joined the School in November, 1916.

(4) Milan Djurić

Milan was a farmer's son from Svilainac in Serbia, a town famous for silk production. He was thirteen when he joined the school in November 1916.

(5) Dimitrije Dulkanović

From Ćuprija in central Serbia, Dimitrije was born in 1900. By the time he arrived in Edinburgh in August 1916, aged sixteen, his father, a merchant, had been killed in the war.
Dimitrije Dulkanovic
Two of his brothers were fighting with the Serbian Army. He left behind his mother and three young sisters.

(6) Stanko Ilić

Stanko was the son of a customs-house official from Smederovo, a town that borders the Danube river to the east of Belgrade. He left a brother and sister behind in Serbia. He was thirteen when he joined the School in September, 1916.

(7) Živko "Žika" Ilić

Almost certainly the most musical and artistic of the group, Žika was one of the four Serbian Herioters who returned to Edinburgh in 1959 to attend the Tercentenary of the School.Zivko Ilic
Sadly the school records of all four boys are missing: presumably they were shown to the boys at the time of their visit and then lost.

(8) Živojin Kovačević

The son of an engineer, Živoin was from Kruševac in central Serbia and was fifteen years old when he arrived at Heriot's in November, 1916.

Zivojin Kovacevic

(9) Gavrilo Lazović

Gavrilo was the son of a police secretary. Originally from Čačak, he arrived at the school in November, 1916, aged fifteen.

Gavrilo LazovicPlease see Radmila Marinović's account of her father's early life.

(10) Milorad Maletić

Milorad was born in 1901, the son of a wood merchant from the rich trading town of Šabac, which lies along the Sava river to the northwest of the country. Šabac was to become famous during the war for having been the site of a horrific massacre of the civilian population by the Hungarian element of the Austro-Hungarian Army. Milorad was fifteen when he joined the school in September 1916, having served in the Serbian Army but escaping combat. The war tore his family apart: his father became an officer in the Serbian Army, his brother was taken prisoner, two of his uncles were killed in Albania, while his mother and three sisters remained in Serbia.

(11) Svetomir "Sveta" Marjanović

Sveta came from a prominent family in Kučevo in northeast Serbia where his grandfather had served as Provost. He was a dark haired, even featured boy who stood at 5'3'' when he joined the school in 1916, aged fifteen.

(12) Miodrag Martić

The son of a farmer who had entered the Army upon the outbreak of war, Miodrag left his mother and three young sisters behind in Serbia.

Miodrag Martic
From Paljevi in central Serbia, he was only thirteen when he joined the school in September, 1914.

(13) Petar Milisavljević

Petar was the son of a deceased merchant from Knjaževac in the east of Serbia, near the Bulgarian border. He was seventeen when he was admitted to Heriot's in November, 1916.

(14) Bojidar Molerović

Bojidar was from Kragujevac. Born in 1898, he was one of the eldest boys. He returned to Heriot's in 1959 to attend the Tercentenary and his record is therefore missing but he was almost certainly admitted to the School in 1916, aged seventeen.

(15) Djordje Nikolić

Djordje attended the Tercentenary in 1959 and his record is therefore missing; however, he almost certainly joined the School in 1916.

(16) Dušan Obradović

The son of a Lieutenant Colonel, Dušan was one three boys from Kruševac in central Serbia. He was fifteen years old when he joined the school in November 1916.

(17) Djordje Osmanbegović

Djordje was from near Niš in central Serbia. The only one who could speak any English before his arrival at Heriot's in September, 1916, his wealthy merchant-shopkeeper family had been able to send him abroad to Vienna for his education. He was sixteen when he joined the school. His father was dead by the time he reached Scotland; his mother remained behind in Serbia caring for his two small sisters.

(18) Petar Pantelić

Petar's school record is missing but it is recorded that he joined the School in September, 1916. The son of a farmer who had joined the Serbian army, by the time he reached Heriot's he knew only that his father had been killed or taken prisoner.

(19) Danilo Pavlović

Danilo was fifteen when he was admitted to the School in November, 1916.

Danilo PavlovicThe son of a police secretary, he was from Prokuplje in central Serbia.

(20) Miodrag Pavlović

Miodrag was the last to join Heriot's, in February, 1919 when he was seventeen years old. He was from a high-ranking military family: his father was a Chief Commandant, 30th Regiment (Infantry). Before arriving in Edinburgh, he had been educated in Belgrade and had attended Cadet School in Poltava, Russia (now Ukraine).

(21) Mihailo Radovanović

From wealthy Šabac, Mihailo had seen his schoolteacher father shot alongside him by the Albanians during the retreat. His widowed mother remained behind in Serbia.

Mihailo Radovanovic
One of his two brothers was a prisoner of war, the other a law student who had become a lieutenant in the Serbian army. He was fourteen when he was admitted to Heriot's in September, 1916.

(22) Aleksandar Savić

The son of a merchant, Aleksandar was from Kruševac in central Serbia. He joined the school in November, 1916, aged sixteen.

(23) Konstantin "Kokan" Stanković

Kokan was admitted to Heriot's in November, 1916. The son of a customs house officer, he was from Pirot near the Serbian border with Bulgaria. He was sixteen when he began classes at Heriot's in November, 1916. During the retreat, aged only fifteen, he had fought the Bulgarians and Albanians with an infantry regiment of the Serbian Army.

(24) Milivoje Stefanović

From Niš in central Serbia, Milivoje was the son of a railway official who had joined the Serbian army. He left his mother and three small brothers behind in Serbia. He was admitted to Heriot's in September, 1916, aged fifteen.

(25) Toma Tomić

Toma was a natural athlete. At 5'9'', he was the tallest of the boys and had a "military bearing and glossy black hair". From Leskovac in southern Serbia, his father was a manufacturer who had also served as the Provost of the town. By the time he joined Heriot's in November, 1916, aged seventeen, he had served six months as an infantry soldier, while a brother was a Captain in the Serbian army. He left five sisters at home.

(26) Miodrag Tutunović

The son of an ordnance factory worker, Miodrag joined Heriot's only in September, 1918, aged seventeen, after transferring from a school in Winchester. Although born in Raška in central Serbia, he was studying in Belgrade at the outset of the war.

(27) Nikola Vasić

Aged only thirteen when he joined the school in September 1916, Nikola was the son of a merchant shopkeeper from Ljibovija, along Serbia's remote western border with what was then Bosnia, which had been annexed in 1908 by Austria-Hungary.

Nikola VasicWhen he was only twelve, he had fought alongside his father during the retreat, leaving behind his mother and five sisters.

 

 

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